usa

2017, america, Camp

Easter at Camp Wandawega

All photos by the man, the myth, the legend: photo wunderkind  Alec Vanderboom.

All photos by the man, the myth, the legend: photo wunderkind Alec Vanderboom.

By far one of our adventures from this crazy year traveling around America was spending Easter weekend at Camp Wandawega in Walworth County, Wisconsin. A few years ago, I wrote a book chronicling the history of Camp Wandawega (you can read that here), but it wasn't until this Spring that I was actually able to visit in person. And maybe the only thing better than spending Easter at Camp Wandawega was having our friend and photographer extraordinaire Alec Vanderboom there with us to document the magic of it all.

*An immeasurable thanks to the wonderful and talented David and Tereasa (and Charlie) for hosting us!

**Learn how you can go visit Camp Wandawega this summer!

***Getting married? You need Alec Vanderboom to take your wedding photos, trust us!

Easter Boys.jpg
These guys have nothing to do with Camp Wandawega, but their portrait is hanging in one of the Camp's bathrooms, and I think it's just about the most epic camp photo I've ever seen. Great find Tereasa!

These guys have nothing to do with Camp Wandawega, but their portrait is hanging in one of the Camp's bathrooms, and I think it's just about the most epic camp photo I've ever seen. Great find Tereasa!

america, travels, The Americans, 2017, USA

The Mansion On The River | Charleston, South Carolina

"It was my father who called the city the Mansion on the River. He was talking about Charleston, South Carolina, and he was a native son, peacock proud of a town so pretty it makes your eyes ache with pleasure just to walk down its spellbinding, narrow streets. Charleston was my father's ministry, his hobbyhorse, his quiet obsession, and the great love of his life. His bloodstream lit up my own with a passion for the city that I've never lost nor ever will...

Because of its devotional, graceful attraction to food and gardens and architecture, Charleston stands for all the principles that make living well both a civic virtue and a standard. It is a rapturous, defining place to grow up. Everything I reveal to you now will be Charleston-shaped and Charleston-governed, and sometimes even Charleston-ruined. But it is my fault and not the city's that it came close to destroying me. Not everyone responds to beauty in the same way. Though Charleston can do much, it can't always improve on the strangeness of human behavior. But Charleston has a high tolerance for eccentricity and bemusement. There is a tastefulness in its gentility that comes from the knowledge that Charleston is a permanent dimple in the understated skyline, while the rest of us are only visitors."

Excerpted from South of Broad, by Pat Conroy, 2009, Doubleday books.